Tag Archives: Terminal illness

Making Real the Good, Bad and Ugly of Terminal Illness – Thank You Yes! Magazine

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Maybe it’s because my work as a community organizer is in my blood, I push to include people and issues that are less understood into routine conversation. Maybe it’s because, while I accept my stage 4b (there is no 4c) ovarian cancer diagnosis at age 50, I still don’t like how it has transformed my life. Or maybe it’s because I hear too often “You look too good to have cancer” from people who don’t understand how that innocent, off-hand comment can disappear my reality of living for five years with continuous chemotherapy treatment.  Whatever the reason, I want to create visibility for the ever-growing community of people living with terminal illness who are in treatment year after year. (Are we survivors? Barely. I am quite sure we are not “thrivers”. I settle on veterans as a better moniker then my personal favorite, losers.)

Illustration by Julie Notarianni

Illustration by Julie Notarianni

I asked a national magazine to cover the topic of people who have terminal disease but are still active in life. They did. Yes! is a quality magazine that takes tough issues and presents them in a solutions frame. We should all be subscribers. I encourage folks to “like” the internet version of the article to show public interest in mortality as a topic for conversation. And who better to lead the discussion than those of us forced into being experts.

In the time it took to move this article from concept to print, far too many of the women I quoted have died. A sadness. Being terminally ill is not a philosophical concept for us; it is an endless process of saying goodbye. It’s gritty and real and currently lonelier than it needs to be. Each of you that listens in or shares our stories are part of the solution.

If you are game – please click on the link and then click the “like” button. Thanks!

http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/the-end-of-poverty/livingly-dying

warmly,
Marcy

What I Learned About Living From Dying of Cancer

Many more patients are now living for years with the diagnosis of terminal illness. The author describes her journey to what she calls “livingly dying”—facing her death by living in the moment with grace and mindfulness.

by Marcy Westerling

Dying inevitably follows living. What makes for a good death in a just and sustainable world? I think about this a lot these days. Four years ago, at age fifty, I was diagnosed with late-stage ovarian cancer. Active and fit, it took a collapsed lung and two broken ribs before I realized I had a big problem, the ultimate challenge of life: facing my own death.

In the first weeks after learning I was terminally ill, I wondered, “Will I face this in my heart or in my head? In my head, it is a storyline I can make interesting, wise, and abstract. In my heart, it is a constant tremor radiating from my stomach.” As the first months of terror subsided, I began to adapt to my “new normal.” My medical team advised, “You must start living as if the next three months are your last. When you are still alive at the close, make a new three-month plan.” I resolved to hope and dream and build in smaller allocations of time.

I made huge shifts in my life, severing two critical anchor points. I moved to the city from the small town that had been my home for 25 years—my isolated existence in the woods seemed too daunting for the emotional swings of terminal cancer. I retired from the organization I had founded and that had been my life’s work for 18 years. I knew the long hours and stress of the job I loved would deplete the strength I needed for cancer treatment.

I qualified for Social Security disability income thanks to the government’s “compassion clause,” and this got me Medicare two and a half years later. I stepped into my new life determined to live as long as possible. I decided I would live to be 72 years old, 19 years longer than the statistics predicted and an age I found acceptable to die.

It’s estimated that one in three people in the United States will receive a cancer diagnosis at some point in life. Some people die quickly. Others diagnosed as terminal continue to live fully even while facing a death sentence. A friend who had watched her mother die of cancer remarked on my vivacity. In the 15 years since her mother’s death, there have been advancements that make the devastating side effects of treatment more tolerable. Still, it has taken me years after my diagnosis to re-embrace the commitments that populate a full life.

I chafe at being invisible as a person with cancer. I am a lifelong feminist and community organizer. I believe in breaking silence and sharing truth. I pass as “normal”—healthy, white, slender, and heterosexual (having a husband helps). I have lived a life of privilege. For now, I don’t look or feel like I’m dying. I am just terminally ill.

Recently I was reminded of the great Rachel Carson. She hid the pain of her end-stage cancer to keep her Silent Spring message of environmental degradation alive in Congress and mainstream conversation back in 1964.

In 2014, I can choose to be visible. I have a tattoo on my wrist declaring me a “Cancer Warrior.” I sport buttons saying “Cancer Sucks.” I pedal everywhere, slowly, on a bike that announces “Cancer on Board.” I defy every attempt to limit me to my diagnosis as I dare the world to ignore it.

But sometimes I feel I am as isolated in shouting about my diagnosis as Rachel Carson was in secrecy. I look so good that observers may well conclude that the sign on my bike, the button on my bags, even the tattoo on my wrist represent strength and survival. Public or private, silent or loud, the outcomes are the same. Disease creates isolation and barriers from the world of the well. A friend with terminal cancer notes, “We cause discomfort to some because we are living, living in acute awareness of our impending death, living in pain but living as fully as we can while we are dying. Should we lock ourselves away in a figurative darkened room so as not to chance disturbing the hale and hearty with thoughts of death?”

People say odd things when they attempt to comfort the terminally ill while avoiding their own fears. “We are all terminally ill. You just know it.” I more than “know it” as my weary veins dodge yet another dose of chemotherapy, toxic poison that will bring me to my knees with exhaustion, nausea, and brain fog while hopefully keeping me alive a while longer.

While the statistics gave me little hope, real people with cancer provide inspiration. They look normal and live well. They laugh, watch TV, and travel. They haven’t stopped living, even as medical appointments, surgeries, treatments, and side effects disrupt their days.

I sought out other women living with a pink slip from life and discovered how hard it is for us to find each other. Medical privacy laws don’t help. Advocacy groups are often Web- or hospital-based, but not everyone flourishes in those settings. Eventually I created my own support circle of other women with terminal cancer. The group is called “It’s a Dying Shame,” and the outreach flyer states, “Our goal is to explore the rich and peculiar territory of facing our own deaths. Together we can mine the humor, strangeness, and beauty of a life turned upside down. Join us for tea down the rabbit hole.” Our group meetings provide a cherished time to speak our truth without taking on the emotions of friends and family.

People often say to the terminally ill, “You are so stoic, so graceful. I could never handle this so well.” Perhaps not. The truth is you have no idea how well or badly we, the dying, handle it. Kim, diagnosed as terminal three years ago at age 34, says, “Each day can vary greatly. Is it a doctor appointment day? Scan day? A day of total rest and relaxation? A day that the thought of me dying before age 40 leaves me immobilized, weeping in bed, and tightly grasping a heating pad? In a month’s time I go through all of these typical days. And then some.”

Social media also allows us to communicate with new ease about approaching death. Thousands follow Lisa Adams’ blog, where she describes every aspect of the medical and emotional realities of facing death as she copes with raising a young family. She doesn’t make it look easy or pretty. Lisa and other dying bloggers offer a view of pain that is normally rarely witnessed and ask that people with terminal cancer be seen as more than “courageous.” Guardian columnist Emma Keller and her husband chided Adams for over-sharing. I think that those who condemn our process are distancing themselves from Lisa—and me—and from the reality of protracted death.

The current rules of polite conversation make the journey toward death more challenging. One woman said to me, “It is like we are standing in a different room.” We are avoided or jollied up. (“You look so good you can’t be terminally ill” is the most hated and common of compliments.) These approaches insulate people in our culture from sitting with death, sadly but comfortably.

When people with terminal diagnoses communicate about their experience, it may make their walking toward death more doable. I cannot think of subjects better suited for full honesty than birth and death.

There is a trend to reframe some terminal cancers as a chronic disease, perhaps to avoid mention of death, to give hope, or because some terminal diseases are becoming more manageable over the years. One woman in her 40s rejected that label after six years in treatment: “For most people, it makes sense to make plans beyond one month at a time, but even that short a time-frame can turn out to be optimistic for me. Unexpected side effects catch up with me; treatments that we thought were working cease to work months earlier than expected, and suddenly we are thrust again into making life-and-death decisions, lacking any real information about what may—or may not —buy me even a few more months of life. Making plans in this context becomes almost a joke. Something about this state that I live in seems really different to me from what I think of as chronic illness. It is more like a slow dying process, during which I get to LIVE.”

I have noticed many of us with terminal cancer are of good cheer and even invigorated by having no presumption of longevity. We have little choice but to live in the moment; something many talk about, but few can manage. When you live treatment to treatment and test result to test result, there is less room for distraction by petty stresses. We can’t expect to live another year, but if we do survive one year, or five, or ten, we consider ourselves very lucky. My mandate is to live with the shadow of death seated comfortably on one shoulder—I rarely forget, but I often dismiss, my new companion.

I have made a certain peace with leaving this world, a peace experienced only after pondering what I might do, where I might be, what I might become after I die. I live in a culture that offers few views of what happens after death—it is either THE END (humus for the ages), or it is some mythic version of heaven and hell. Neither option works for me. I imagine my next world as Peter Pan did, “To die will be an awfully big adventure,” even if his image of death is more boisterous than mine.

Weeks after my diagnosis, before relocating to the city, I sat in the spring sunshine by a creek at our homestead while my sweetie did the chores I couldn’t do post-surgery. This was a favorite spot of mine. The chickens made comforting clucks in their enclosure to my right while the ducks quacked comically in the pasture to my left. The warmth of the sun reached every nook of my body. I was surrounded by so much that I loved—the tears I cried were happy ones. Couldn’t this be my heaven?

Today, I live in a lovely neighborhood, in a lovely house surrounded by pleasures that don’t take away the sorrow of departure. My life stays filled with joy and meaning as well as sadness and grief. I am livingly dying. Dying is woven into the reality of living. Neither is easy. But just as we live as a community, let’s face death as a community too.

Marcy Westerling wrote this article for The End of Poverty, the Fall 2014 issue of YES! Magazine. Marcy is a long-time community organizer with a passion for justice. She founded the Rural Organizing Project (ROP) in 1992. She is currently on her seventh approach to stabilize her cancer. She blogs at livinglydying.com

Vignette Two – Nothing Compares 2U

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As promised, Vignette Two – Compass Oncology – another heartbreaker revealing exactly where the patient fits into the medical industrial complex.

The great singer Sinead O’Connor launches into her 1990 heartbreaker Nothing Compares 2U counting down, “It’s been seven hours and fifteen days”. I always loved that opening. Since leaving Compass Oncology July 30th at 1:30 p.m. that fragment has frequented my mind. There was no romance involved with my heartbreak. It was a purely dispassionate reminder that the medical industrial complex only wants to prolong my life one way – their way. 

But you judge as I recount.

As soon as I choose the Bruckner Protocol, my team not only took on the task of getting me into this NYC clinic but also took on scrolling for prospective local providers to partner with the protocol. While we awaited OHSU’s determination, I asked around for oncologists who were either creative or in small private settings. We needed low red tape. Compass Oncology met neither of those criteria but several people pointed to the same doc as “prioritizing what the patient wanted” and no other names were offered up. So we gave him a try despite reservations – we hoped by being very, very clear we could avoid wasting resources.

Friends worked with the new patient administrator to clarify the sole purpose of the appointment, a local doctor to administer this protocol, and underlined that given my current travels and treatment I did not want to fit in an appointment with a lukewarm prospect or a dead end. I only was willing to meet with an interested doctor. (Am I repeating myself enough?) We checked in regularly to make sure that all the clarifying paperwork was in and reviewed in advance. The new patient administrator was great and reassuring until the final week. She confessed all she was doing to meet our reasonable demands but expressed doubts that the doctor was paying attention. The day prior, she called to say the doctor had pledged to call me that day with any questions. I stayed home and waited. No call came. The friend accompanying me wanted to know, “are we on?”, I gulped and said, “yes”. She arrived to pick me up at 10:15 the next morning.

The receptionist greeted us with over 20 pages of paperwork that I refused to fill out, saying, “I am here for a yes or no. If I become a new patient I will fill it out.” The new patient administrator was called in to back me up. I now had a clipboard of only three pages to fill out. I thought about the ever-expanding marcy westerling medical forest

clear cut for paperwork never to be read

clear cut for paperwork never to be read

being clear cut in my honor – a clear cut I could come to terms with if any health care provider had ever proven to read the reams of pages they demand. Sometimes I entertain myself by leaving pages blank – no one ever calls me back to fill in the blanks. Never.

My friend and I return to waiting. We watch a YouTube of African cocoa growers being introduced to chocolate, the product they make possible, for the first time. It helps five minutes pass. But then I am out front of the building pacing the in fresh air that gives me calm – even if the fresh air is in a large parking lot on a busy street. I create a pacing grid keeping me near the entrance. My pedometer will tell me I pace for over a mile while waiting. We are called in, put in a typical small, airless room to wait. I open the door, pace the hall both to observe and calm. I watch three women at a counter chatting. I decide to engage. “When do you think I might actually see my doctor? It’s been quite the wait.” They all rush to aid but of course have the non-answers of the system, “oh, he must be on his way.”

Eventually, a cheerful young woman arrives to review. She starts off poorly inquiring about a doctor I haven’t seen in years. This would be the pattern for the next hour. I was not nice. I said, “hmmm. I wonder if you have found the health summery that clearly shows who are my current doctors.” I then clarified, again, “I am here for one reason and one reason only and that is to hear if the doctor will do a specific protocol. It is a yes – no situation.” She left and then sent in the next woman who spent the first five minutes shuffling papers in her lap but at least in an effort to drill down to the topic at hand. Clearly no pre-work happened. She avoided eye contact. I was now a problem patient.

Her questions once started were mainly relevant; although she too was convinced doctors and systems of year’s prior were still treating me. Whatever. I moved her to 2014. I moved her to the protocol. There was a lot of silence as she studied the simple sheet of documentation. Her questions got smarter as she focused in. She might not have done homework but she was a quick study who wasn’t sure she liked what she saw. She said, tell me more about this clinical trail. I told her it was not a clinical trail. She insisted it was. I insisted it was not and three minutes were lost with the back and fourth that ended in truce not resolution. Then she decided it must not be legal. I assured it was, that all the drugs were FDA approved and covered by Medicare. She disagreed. I said it was off label use, routinely done. She assured me it was never done. Sigh. This was getting old. I switched tactics and asked her to look at how healthy I was, the robust lab results and the declining ca 125, perhaps, my body could provide testimonial. She conceded my point.

She left the room, we returned to waiting, me back exploring the boring hallways that make up every medical facility I visit.

The doctor arrived. He entered and immediately informed us he would never do the protocol. What perfect clarity for yesterday! He informed us I have recurrent ovarian cancer and it runs a certain course. Yes, I concurred, why did he think I was being so creative in my treatment options? He then proceeded in his own go round of why Medicare would never pay for this; my facts were entirely not relevant although I repeated Medicare was already paying for these treatments for me. I was ready to leave. My friend had given up a half day of work. The doctor closed with my favorite comment, “As a quality of life issue, you should not be flying back and fourth to NYC every other week for treatment.” OH MY GOD – this is exactly why we were in his office. Agreement and rejection in one farcical visit.

This doctor and this agency had every right to reject my request for a certain treatment. In fact, we anticipated it and thus requested they skim the few pages of data and give us their first instinct opinion. If it was a likely no, no need to proceed. We met every one of their requests for endless paperwork. They clearly understood their own staff’s repeated request that they review in advance. In the medical industrial system, those in power nod their heads agreeable, and proceed with the endless bureaucracy that ensures they can bill and the patient’s have a new hobby – sitting in waiting rooms.

By the way, the greeting for patients on the Compass Oncology website  states, “The experts at Compass Oncology are here for you every step of the way with answers, support, compassion and respect. We understand cancer treatment is a highly personal journey, uniquely different for each patient. It is a journey filled with many decisions and potential directions. For decades, the physicians and staff at Compass Oncology have been united by a singular focus: to help our patients find a clear path to hope and healing.”compass-footer-logo

Welcome to Livingly Dying

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Welcome to a space dedicated to the process of livingly dying – staring at imminent mortality and yet residing in the world of the living. More and more of us are finding the words terminally ill and chronic illness co-mingle. We are living longer and better despite a dire diagnosis/prognosis. But the path is not easy.

We bounce between denial, deep despair, and sheer optimism. All the while, many of us face treatment regimes that whittle us down and a current culture in the United States unfamiliar with sitting with death and dying. These writings will be of most value for:
a. people navigating the balance of living when told you are dying
b. people pursuing creative approaches, especially those stimulating our immune systems to fight back the diseases trampling us
c. people interested in witnessing one person living each day with terminal illness.
Livingly Dying Essays, Clinical Trial & Creative Approaches,  and Medical Industrial Complex Woes make up the three categories on the lower right column of the front page allowing you easy access to content that most interests you. To receive new posts click the follow button in the upper right column. I share my journey to support collective efforts to live well while dying. I am feeling my way out loud. Thank you for joining me. Comments are always welcome, in fact, they cheer on the process. If you scroll below this welcome, you will find the running narrative with most current post on top.

For those who like seeing and hearing more than reading, click for the YouTube film of me explaining the concept of Livingly Dying https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=365W0sJq8BE 

Alive! Three years into the cancer journey

Alive! Four + years into the terminally living journey.

Marcy Westerling – marcy@rop.org